oubliette

hits the requisite 70s italo notes, but does it with an undertone of real pain - the melody is mournful, wistful where it could have tacky and in-jokey

(Source: Spotify)


supervillain:

seanwitzke:

Tucker stone and I write about our Top 20 films of 2013 over at the Factual.

Our list includes two films from Sandy B, lots of guys on boats, and a top two you could have guessed months ago. (Surprise, they’re all Delivery Man!) The number two movie, I think I got to a thing that made it so special for me, and I believe I’m the only person to talk about the Lords of Salem as a radical feminist movie in print (I googled, couldn’t find a damn thing close). More importantly: Tucker writing about Captain Phillips and a few others at the top of his game. Check it out if that sounds good.

been waiting on this and damn does it deliver. to pick one quote at random (though i could quote the entire thing it’s so on-point):

"It can’t be dismissed that great American horror movies, the ones from the generation that created slashers and zombies, were closer to the extremely low budget former mumblecore set than anyone who puts a trailer up on Bloody Disgusting. People who make a lot of movies really quickly, who learn their craft on the fly, whether the films are good or not. That’s not just the territory of Cassavettes. Movies made for nothing with great scripts, strong actors, and no qualms about committing to fucked up choices. That’s the real legacy of Carpenter/Craven/Romero/Cronenberg/etc. Not four seasons of The Walking Dead, not Platinum Dunes, not pre-loaded fanbases, not last minute Damon Lindelof rewrites of an already finished movie, not screenwriter to screenwriter racist trope jokes. Slasher movies have a rich history of being way better than they have any right to be, because rigid structure can create a space for idiosyncratic voices and variations. It was easier to make them and earn a profit with the economic layout at the time. It was always the place where art met commerce.”

- Sean Witzke on You’re Next


a-bittersweet-life:

Claire Denis’ Bastards.

hell of a year when you have to decide between this and Drug War. denis’s command of - somehow - tactile visuals is in full force here, and as she ramps up the intensity toward the end the editing becomes erratic, the camera swaying, the score (THE SCORE) buzzing and scraping until that final sequence, which is at once way too horrific and impressively restrained.  View Larger

a-bittersweet-life:

Claire Denis’ Bastards.

hell of a year when you have to decide between this and Drug War. denis’s command of - somehow - tactile visuals is in full force here, and as she ramps up the intensity toward the end the editing becomes erratic, the camera swaying, the score (THE SCORE) buzzing and scraping until that final sequence, which is at once way too horrific and impressively restrained. 


Heavy Rocks →

my first piece on medium! i ride gravity like a prize pony